If we want to rein in the costs of the U.S. health-care system — now equal to nearly 18 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product — we cannot ignore the fragmented technologies used to help heal and save lives.

At first glance, the devices, monitors, electronic health records and machines found in today’s hospitals might inspire awe. Look beyond the slick displays with blinking lights, however, and the picture is less reassuring. Rather than working as an integrated whole, these technologies rarely “speak” to one another, reducing productivity and increasing costs. As a result, time that clinicians might spend at the bedside or discussing patient cases with colleagues is used to fill in the gaps between uncoordinated technologies.

This post is from Dr. Peter Pronovost, Senior Vice President for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine and Co-founder of Doctella. This is an excerpt reposted from his blog, Voices for Safer Care. Please visit his website to read the full article.